The Economy and Web Analytics Jobs

A lot of people have lost their jobs over the last few months, and a lot more probably will. Most people in analytics know that there is more demand for skilled Web analysts than there is supply. So, would you say that experts in analytics have recession-proof jobs by default?

I keep seeing a lot of articles and content poping up on the Web about recession-proofing your job. Most of them say that you need to appear indespisible (perception is reality, right?) as well as be more of a jack-of-all-trades. Here’s a podcast from Harvard Business Review on this:

Harvard Business IdeaCast 110: How to Protect Your Job in a Recession

What can Web analytics people do to recession-proof themselves?

As I see it we can do several things at least:

  1. Constantly (and I mean almost daily!) turn out ideas to improve your company’s online presence
  2. Present to management often (to increase your visibility and the perception of being indespensible)
  3. Speak at conferences (analytics or otherwise) and become better know in your company’s own industry (unless the bad economy has resulted in your travel budget being shot!)

One other thing that you can do to recession-proof your job is to keep some information close to the vest. That is, don’t run out and tell everyone in your company how to do everything that you do. If you document exactly how to do all of the technical aspects of your job, this might also hurt you in recession-proofing your job. I can’t say that I really agree with everything here about not sharing things about your job skills, but I’m just throwing it out there as something that we all know is done in reality.

Do you have any further ideas as to how people in Web analytics can help themselves in recession-proofing their jobs in this economy?

5 thoughts on “The Economy and Web Analytics Jobs

  1. Not entirely sure I agree with the comment:

    “One other thing that you can do to recession-proof your job is to keep some information close to the vest. That is, don’t run out and tell everyone in your company how to do everything that you do.”

    I tend to think that if I can get more people thinking like I do and doing what I do then it pushes my profile because they will come to me for ‘expert analysis’, rather than just ‘analysis’.

    Most people won’t have the time or inclination to go into the statistical analysis and link it to the real world to get to the point where they can do it without you. They’re happier to do the things with web analytics that help them in their jobs and look to you for the ‘value add’.

    IMHO.

  2. I have to agree with Alec. The more I share, the more they keep coming back for expert advice in the same way that I go back to those who taught me for expert advice.

  3. I think an important thing to do is spend some of your time branding yourself – a blog is a simple, easy way to start though there are other way too. I also disagree with keeping information to yourself – that’s old school logic that is shown to fail over and over again. If anything, blog these insights!

  4. Several people have commented that they don’t agree with me about keeping “some information close to the vest.” I think that you all must have stopped before reading the very next sentence which was:

    I can’t say that I really agree with everything here about not sharing things about your job skills, but I’m just throwing it out there as something that we all know is done in reality.

    I do not think that you should do this, but I do know people that practice this very tactic of creating job security. I also think that it’s quite transparent what people are doing why they act like this, and that they are not really fooling anyone. As Mike Neel said:

    It’s old school logic that is shown to fail over and over again.

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